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TitleExperiences of District-Based Support Team with regards to screening identification assessment and support implementation in Zululand district, KwaZulu Natal
AuthorZulu, Phindile Doreen
SubjectDistrict-based support team
SubjectExperiences
SubjectSchool-based support team
SubjectScreening
SubjectIdentification
SubjectAssessment
SubjectSupport
Subject371.9046096842
SubjectInclusive education -- South Africa -- Zululand District Municipality -- Administration -- Case studies
SubjectEducation and state -- South Africa -- Zululand District Municipality -- Case studies
SubjectSpecial education -- South Africa -- Zululand District Municipality -- Administration -- Case studies
SubjectSchool management and organization -- South Africa -- Zululand District Municipality -- Case studies
SubjectChildren with disabilities -- Education -- South Africa -- Zululand District Municipality -- Case studies
SubjectSchool support teams -- South Africa -- Zululand District Municipality -- Case studies
Date2020-10-22T10:12:20Z
Date2020-10-22T10:12:20Z
Date2019-08-23
Date2020-10-22
TypeThesis
Format1 online resource (xvi, 259 leaves) : color illustrations
Formatapplication/pdf
AbstractDistrict-based support teams (DBSTs) are tasked with supporting the implementation of inclusive education (IE). One of the core purposes of the Department of Education is to ensure that the whole system is organised in such a way that there is effective delivery of education and support services to all learners who experience barriers to learning and development, in both public ordinary as well as public special schools (Department of Education, 2009). This study investigated the experiences of DBSTs in their work of screening, identification, assessment and support (SIAS) implementation regarding Special Needs Education Services (SNES) in the Zululand District of the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Education. In an effort to understand their experiences, a qualitative research approach was adopted in which a case study design was employed. Six district officials were purposively identified (five females and one male). Six principals were also interviewed. The study employed interpretivism as the research paradigm. Data was generated through observations, document reviews and analysis, and semi-structured interviews. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. Theoretically, the study was framed by Deming’s Plan, Do, Check, Act (PDCA) cycle (Deming, 1986). Findings reveal that there is a lack of collaboration between district stakeholders and a lack of recognition and support from management. The vastness of the district and the workload makes it difficult to provide adequate support. The study concluded that collaboration among professionals within a district and all other stakeholders contribute significantly to the effective functioning of the DSTBs. It is therefore recommended that in order to ensure effective and functional DSTBs, it is important that continued support and collaboration among stakeholders be facilitated. The study also suggested further areas of research.
AbstractInclusive Education
AbstractD. Phil. (Education)
Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10500/26727