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Title GENETIC ORIGINS OF THE INTRODUCED PEA WEEVIL (BRUCHUS PISORUM) POPULATION IN ETHIOPIA
AuthorScheepers, Loraine Cornelia
SubjectGenetics
Date2013-05-17
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Formatapplication/pdf
AbstractThis study aimed to determine the origin of pea weevils (Bruchus pisorum) in Ethiopia and to determine the current population structure across that country. The pea weevil is presently a widely distributed pest of peas in Ethiopia, causing huge financial losses. Conflicting hypotheses exist on the origin of B. pisorum in Ethiopia. It was possibly introduced to Ethiopia sometime in the 1970s, or it might have occurred historically in the area in very low numbers. The methodology of this study consisted of finding populations of pea weevils across the globe and then comparing these populations with the population currently found in Ethiopia. Specimens were obtained from Ethiopia, the USA, Germany and Australia. Gene sequences of pea weevils from China and Japan were also downloaded from GenBank to serve as reference material. DNA was extracted, amplified and sequenced using standard protocols, with the exception of the USA sample which was composed of museum specimens that demanded a non-destructive DNA extraction method. Three gene regions were used in this study: the Elongation Factor 1alpha (EF-1α), Cytochrome oxidase subunit one (COX1) and Cytochrome b (Cytb). The COX1 and Cytb sequence data provided insight into a possible source population of pea weevils in Ethiopia, whereas results from EF-1α were uninformative. Pea weevils from the USA were identified as a possible direct source, but it should be noted that these pea weevils are not endemic to the USA. The possibility of an endemic population of pea weevils in Ethiopia is also discussed. Tests for differentiation indicated that there was some differentiation between the Ethiopian subpopulations. This variation is discussed with reference to possible multiple sources of introduction for the current population in Ethiopia, genetic drift since introduction, and the possibility of a mixture of endemic and introduced genetic material in B. pisorum in Ethiopia.
PublisherUniversity of the Free State
Identifierhttp://etd.uovs.ac.za//theses/available/etd-05172013-114250/restricted/