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TitleExperiences of analogue-trained radiographers utilising digital imaging in projection radiography
AuthorCampbell, Sydney
SubjectRadiography, Medical -- Digital techniques
SubjectAngiography
SubjectImage processing -- Digital techniques
SubjectRadiography
Date2017
TypeThesis
TypeMasters
TypeMTech
Formatxviii, 144 leaves
Formatpdf
AbstractThe professional work of a radiographer encompasses both patient care and the use of technology. The technology employed could either be analogue or digital technology. Since 1973, the analogue imaging system has slowly been replaced by digital radiography imaging systems. Despite the many advantages of digital imaging it does present the radiographer with added responsibilities. Furthermore, analogue-trained radiographers have found adjusting to digital imaging especially challenging. The aim of the study was to explore and describe the experiences of analogue-trained radiographers utilising digital imaging in projection radiography with the intention of developing guidelines to equip radiography managers to assist analogue-trained radiographers to better utilise digital imaging. The researcher used Schlossberg’s Transition Theory as a lens to look at the experiences of analogue-trained radiographers using digital imaging to produce radiographs. The research study used a qualitative design which was explorative, descriptive and contextual in nature. The target population included all diagnostic radiographers (public and private) in the local municipality who were registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa. Purposive sampling was employed to select the radiographers that represented all radiographers in the Nelson Mandela Bay Health District. The sample included all radiographers who fulfilled the identified selection criteria. The selected participants were recruited to take part in in-depth, semi-structured individual interviews. The data was analysed using a computer-aided qualitative data analysis software package, ATLAS.ti. The trustworthiness of this study was ensured by applying Guba’s model of trustworthiness that includes credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability. The ethical principles of respect for persons, beneficence and justice, as espoused by the Belmont Report, were adhered to in order to ensure that the study was conducted in an ethical manner. Two themes emanated from the data, namely the evolution of the radiographer when faced with the advances in technology as well the role that the work environment played in the manner that the participants experienced the change. The experiences of the participants were described using direct quotations from the interviews and a literature control was used to verify the participants’ experiences. Evidence was found of radiographer indifference towards exposure selection, dose optimisation and placement of anatomical side markers when utilising digital imaging. Finally, guidelines were developed to equip radiography managers to assist analogue-trained radiographers to better utilise digital imaging. In addition, the guidelines will assist all other radiographers to better utilise digital imaging.
PublisherNelson Mandela Metropolitan University
PublisherFaculty of Health Sciences
Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10948/14796
Identifiervital:27851