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TitleEXPECTATIONS AND EXPERIENCES OF FORMAL FULL-SERVICE RESTAURANT DINERS IN PORT ELIZABETH
AuthorMhlanga, Osward
SubjectDiners (Restaurants) - Customer services - Port Elizabeth - South Africa
SubjectConsumer satisfaction
SubjectFood - Quality
SubjectSERVQUAL (service quality framework)
SubjectDissertations, Academic - South Africa - Bloemfontein
Date2015-02-20T09:39:37Z
Date2015-02-20T09:39:37Z
Date2015-02-20
Date2014
TypeThesis
Format(2 620 003 bytes, 1 file
FormatApplication/PDF
AbstractThesis (M. Tech. (Tourism and Hospitality management)) -- Central University, Free State, 2014
AbstractThe formal full-service restaurant industry in South Africa is undergoing a period of anaemic growth due to the after effects of the 2009 global economic recession. Since the recession, industry growth has been subdued as diners seek more for their money when spending at restaurants. Consequently, industry revenue declined 1.8% in 2013 as diners tightened their purse strings. It is for this reason that it was decided to investigate diners’ expectations and experiences in selected formal full-service restaurants in Port Elizabeth. A pilot study was conducted among five diners in two formal full-service restaurants in Port Elizabeth, and the empirical study was conducted in December 2011 and January 2012 among 400 diners of eight formal full-service restaurants in Port Elizabeth. The research findings revealed that respondents with a tertiary diploma recorded the highest expectation score (4.25) whilst those who spoke languages other than Afrikaans, English, IsiZulu and IsiXhosa recorded the lowest (3.69). Respondents in the age group 55 to 64 years recorded the highest experience score (4.53) whilst those who spoke IsiXhosa recorded the lowest (3.84). Altogether 44.5% of the respondents frequented restaurants at different intervals two to four times in the previous six months whilst 51.2% spent on average, R200 to R299 per person and 18.5% held occupations in business, commerce and finance. Respondents who spent more than R399 had the highest expectation score (4.53) whilst those who frequented restaurants at different intervals more than 10 times in the previous six months had the lowest (3.97). Respondents with an occupation in education reported the highest experience score (4.36) whilst those who frequented restaurants at different intervals of nil to one time in the previous six months reported the lowest (4.04). A total of 22% of the respondents patronised restaurants because of good service. Restaurant B obtained the highest expectation (4.39) and experience (4.51) scores whilst restaurant C recorded the lowest expectation (3.71) and experience (4.03) scores. All diners’ experiences were below expectations giving an overall gap of -0.47. The strongest correlation with diners’ expectations was level of service whilst the strongest correlation with diners’ experiences was food quality. The regression model showed that the level of service was rated as the most important variable for diners’ expectations whilst the quality of food was rated as the most important for diners’ experiences. However, recommendations were made to improve diners’ experiences in the selected formal full-service restaurants in Port Elizabeth. The results of this study would help restaurateurs to identify areas of improvement and increase customer satisfaction.
PublisherBloemfontein: Central University of Technology, Free State
Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/11462/230