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TitleEvaluating the implementation of HIV and AIDS policies at a major South African Hotel group
AuthorVan der Berg, Christine Margaret
SubjectCentral University of Technology, Free State - Dissertations
SubjectHIV infections - Government policy - South Africa
SubjectAIDS (Disease) - Government policy - South Africa
SubjectHIV infections - Social aspects - South Africa
SubjectAIDS (Disease) - Social aspects - South Africa
SubjectDissertations, academic - South Africa - Bloemfontein
Date2014-10-18T21:09:05Z
Date2014-10-18T21:09:05Z
Date2012
TypeThesis
Format1 143 255 bytes
Formatapplication/pdf
AbstractThesis (M. Tech. (Tourism and Hospitality management)) -- Central university of Technology, Free State, 2012
AbstractSouth Africa is the country with the largest population of HIV and AIDS sufferers in Sub-Saharan Africa. Since AIDS is an incurable disease that mostly affects individuals in their productive years, it could have a disruptive impact on the productivity and financial sustainability of organisations, which is especially true in the hospitality industry where long and strenuous working hours are often expected from staff. With this in mind, the study aimed to evaluate the level of implementation of HIV and AIDS policies in the hospitality industry, by focusing on a major South African hotel group. This particular hotel group operates a number of individual hotels throughout South Africa. To ensure that all geographical areas were covered, major cities in three different provinces were identified as suitable locations for individual hotels to be identified for the study. The city of Durban, representing the Kwazulu-Natal Province, was selected on the basis of being the worst-affected area, with Bloemfontein (Free State Province) and Cape Town (Western Cape Province) as the medium-affected and least-affected area respectively. The data, which was gathered by means of a questionnaire, was interpreted both qualitatively and quantitatively. The findings show that the respondents were not always aware of the existence of HIV and AIDS policies and that these were not being adequately communicated to staff. The findings also indicate that the respondents do not fully comprehend the disruptive nature of the disease or the fact that it could negatively affect productivity and profit.
PublisherBloemfontein : Central University of Technology, Free State
Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/11462/175