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TitleThe effect of the growth in global tourism development in Cape Town on health promotion with specific reference to the spread of HIV/AIDS
AuthorNgamije, James
Date2014-10-09T11:31:25Z
Date2016-01-27T08:31:48Z
Date2014-10-09T11:31:25Z
Date2016-01-27T08:31:48Z
Date2014
TypeThesis
AbstractThesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree: Master of Technology Environmental Health Department of Environmental and Occupational Studies Faculty of Applied Sciences at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology Cape Peninsula University of Technology 2014
AbstractInternational Tourism development has been given a positive image as a tool to pro-mote development in the world of the poor, and an important tool for response in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015 placing health at the heart of poverty alleviation. International tourism development is not only a sector that fit the applicability of international development theory but is also often voiced and enthusiastically supported. As an economic development industry, international tourism development has been a choice for many of the poorest countries in the world as it is supported by international institutions such as the United Nations and World Bank to address the notions of inequalities and poverty reduction alongside environmental considerations. In addition, tourism is perceived to pull wealth from rich countries into the world of the poor with a high potential to trickle down to the vil-lages and the poorest communities. However, the evidence that international tourism development can benefit the poor on grassroots level is difficult to prove because no data in this regard is available. Given the fact that the time stipulated to complete the noble goals of MDGs is very near, this study intends to ask: to what extent is health and sustainable tourism development applicable in Africa? And a number of ques-tions arise that this thesis, in a broad sense seeks to address. What are barriers to the contribution of the international tourism development in less developed countries (LDCs)? To which context of international development theories, is international tour-ism development positioned with relationship to economic growth, equitable distribu-tion of profits, and sustainable development and health? And who are ultimately the beneficiaries of international tourism development? For the most part, the contribu-tion of this research project deals critically with tourism opportunities and risks related to community health. The focus is on tourism development and inequality, poverty alleviation alongside environmental consideration, reducing gender inequality and exploitation, HIV/AIDS and promoting sustainable tourism development and health, to mention few. This research project aims to presents an important contribution to the debate regarding the relationship between international tourism development in the world of the poor such as Africa in the age of global political economy or free trade, and the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS. This research investigates current international development approaches that offer new and exciting insights. However, there is a need for further critical analysis of the complex dynamics on the effects of interna-tional tourism development throughout the sequence of international development iii theories in developing countries, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. It seems that in the absence of a moral responsibility and collaboration of all stakeholders in promot-ing equity in tourism benefits, opportunities offered for sustainable tourism develop-ment and health will not materialize. The policy maker in tourism planning in develop-ing countries who are now asked to be more responsible to a broader set of econom-ic and social needs in developing countries are concerned about planning for desira-ble economic benefits as well as social and cultural impacts. Tackling issues from ethnological perspectives, advocators for sustainable tourism development in the world of the poor such as United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) and World Bank advocate socially responsible and sustainable tourism development and health in accordance to the decided upon MGDs. From analysis of the opportunities and risks related to integrating international tourism development as a panacea led the researcher interest in testing how small state grapple with the dilemma of tourism development and community health. This study combined two approaches, namely the (i) human security threats and (ii) the use of Clive Thomas’ four prong typology as well as using Cape Town as a case study to meet this objective.
PublisherCape Peninsula University of Technology
Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11838/792