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TitleHindrances to learning to program in an introductory programmimg module
AuthorMarokane, Thomas Selakane
SubjectLearn to program
SubjectIntroductory programming
SubjectHigher learning
SubjectPersonal factors
SubjectStudents
SubjectTeaching
SubjectLearning
SubjectCurriculum
SubjectProgramming
SubjectChallenges
SubjectFailure
SubjectHindrances
SubjectEducators
SubjectLecturers
SubjectMixed methods
SubjectProgramming syllabus
SubjectModule
SubjectFactors
SubjectTutorials
Subject020.711
SubjectProgramming (Computers)
SubjectComputer-assisted instruction -- Programming
SubjectInformation science -- Computer programs
SubjectInformation technology
SubjectLibrary education -- Technological innovations
SubjectAcademic achievement
Date2017-10-12T07:35:10Z
Date2017-10-12T07:35:10Z
Date2017
TypeDissertation
Format1 online resource (176 leaves) : illustrations (some color)
AbstractIntroductory programming failure rate among students is high worldwide, including in South Africa. The failure rate remains a subject for investigation due to a high number of students who find learning to program difficult. This study evaluates factors that contribute to high failure rates in an introductory programming module at University of South Africa. The study evaluates curriculum, programming syllabus, and personal factors to evaluate reasons for high failure rates. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are used to identify learning hindrances. The research results show that personal factors are the leading contributing factors, followed by the curriculum and then the programming syllabus. Personal factors relate to time, personal reasons, and commitments; curriculum involves tutorials; and programming syllabus factors are linked to programming concepts and application. The findings have implications for how teaching and learning in introductory programming can be improved. The study provides recommendations for improvement and future studies. Keywords: Learn to program; introductory programming; higher learning; personal
AbstractSchool of Computing
AbstractM. Tech (Information Technology)
Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10500/23228