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TitleExploring working conditions of social workers at Makhado Municipality in Limpopo Province
AuthorMakongoza, Azwihangwisi Abel
SubjectSocial workers
SubjectWorking conditions
SubjectSocial services
SubjectSocial workers -- South Africa -- Limpopo
SubjectSocial service -- South Africa -- Limpopo
SubjectSocial workers -- Supervision of
SubjectSocial work administration -- South Africa -- Limpopo
Date2020-09-24T08:54:21Z
Date2020-09-24T08:54:21Z
Date2019
TypeThesis
Formatix, 93 leaves
AbstractThesis (MPA.) -- University of Limpopo, 2019
AbstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the working conditions of social workers at Makhado Municipality in Limpopo Province by focusing on the provision of resources, supervision and caseload. The qualitative research approach was used face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were utilised as a data collecting method from participants. Purposive sampling was used as a sub-type of non-probability sampling. The study was conducted at Makhado Municipality in Vhembe District in Limpopo Province. Data was collected from social workers working under Makhado Municipality and analysed through thematic analysis. It was found that social workers are not provided with adequate resources to render quality social work services, and that lack of availability of transport and office space is a serious challenge. It was further found that social workers are working without enabling trade tools such as computers, printers, photocopying machines, fax machines and cell-phones. It was further found that social workers are not getting quality supervision, and supervisors are not taking supervision as seriously as it shall be. Moreover, it was found that social workers have high caseloads, which is negatively affecting service delivery. The study recommends that the Department of Social Development prioritise the provision of trade tools such as transport, computers, cell-phones, printers, photocopy machines and stationery. The study further recommends that the Department of Social Development employ more supervisors, social auxiliary workers and social workers to reduce high caseloads. Moreover, the study recommends that the Department of Social Development increase the infrastructure budget and ensure that it builds more offices for social workers.
Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10386/3135