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TitleExamining the nature and extent to which learners with special educational needs are included in regular schools: the case of four primary schools in Cape Town, South Africa
AuthorShadaya, Girlie
Subject
Subject
Subject
Subject
SubjectSpecial education -- South Africa -- Cape Town
SubjectInclusive education -- South Africa -- Cape Town
SubjectChildren with disabilities -- Education -- South Africa -- Cape Town
Date2016
TypeThesis
TypeDoctoral
TypePhD
Format266 leaves
Formatpdf
AbstractThe study is premised on the assumptions that learners with special educational needs are not fully included in regular schools and that perceptions of teachers influence their behaviour toward and acceptance of learners with special educational needs in regular classes. In light of this, the aim of the current study was to examine the nature and extent to which learners with special educational needs are included in regular schools with the ultimate aim of assisting learners with special educational needs to be fully catered for by schools and teachers. The researcher opted for the mixed method approach which is embedded in the post positivist research paradigm. The mixed method approach makes use of quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection, presentation and analysis. Data were generated from a sample of 60 teachers and 4 principals from 4 regular primary schools mainly through questionnaires. Data were also generated from interviews, observation and documents. These data from interviews, observation and documents were used to buttress results from the questionnaires. The findings of this present study showed that many schools are now moving towards inclusivity. There is a relative prevalence of learners with disability in schools. The study also established that the inclusion of learners with special educational needs in regular schools was faced with a number of problems. There were inadequate professionally-trained teachers in schools. Shortage of classrooms, large class sizes, equipment and materials affected the quality of access to education for learners with special educational needs. Although there was significant support at school level, it emerged that there was inadequate quality in-service training programmes for teachers conducted by district officials. Overall, the findings of the study have confirmed the assumptions of the study. For learners with special educational needs to be fully included in regular schools, the study would recommend that the government improve the quality of teachers through in-service training programmes. Moreover, schools must be adequately resourced and government should commit itself to the alleviation of large class sizes. The study further revealed that, gaps still exist in the inclusion of learners with special educational needs between the intended and the actual practice. The study, therefore, recommends that research be conducted with the possibility of establishing strategies for the inclusion of learners with special educational needs in regular schools. This might improve the actual practice of including learners with special educational needs in regular schools. In turn, learners with special educational needs can be said to have equal access to education.
PublisherUniversity of Fort Hare
PublisherFaculty of Education
Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10353/2336
Identifiervital:27754